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GEORGE, Epaminondas P.


SOURCE NOTATION:
    Johnstown Tribune, 30 Oct 1915, Page 7, Contributed by Diann Olsen

E. P. GEORGE IS KILLED; MOTHER AT DEATH'S DOOR

Had Returned from Her Bedside and Was Run Down Near Juniata

A PROMINENT MASON

E. P. George, a native of Summerhill and well-known in South Fork, where he has relatives, was run down and instantly killed by a yard locomotive at RV office, near the Red Bridge, Juniata, at 12:32 o'clock this morning, one hour after he had left his home there to take charge of his run. His mother, Mrs. Mary George, past 80 years old, whom he had visited in South Fork only last evening, is dying. She will not be informed of her son's violent death.

George was awaiting the arrival of engine No. 2307 and his cabin car, prior to taking a train over the mountain. He failed to see engine No. 1603 moving from the westbound freight track to No. 1 running track, as he stood just outside the RV office. Hurled to the track, George was rolled along for a short distance and the engine passed over him, crushing out his life. His body was badly mangled and his skull was fractured, it is said.

Engineer John Carey and Fireman Fred L. Hyle, both of Altoona, were in charge of the yard engine. His body was found a short time later when Engineer Harvey L. Rhine and Fireman L. R. Folk, members of his crew, discovered the remains on the track. They were horrified to find their fellow employee dead. His remains were placed on an engine and brought to the Pennsy morgue at the Altoona depot and Coroner W. T. Blackburn was notified. The body will be taken in charge by Funeral Directors Roher & Mauk, of Juniata.

Last evening George had returned from South Fork where he visited his aged mother, with his daughter, Helen. On his arrival in Juniata, the conductor went to the United Evangelical Church and attended services there when he was summoned to work. He left home shortly after 11 o'clock and had not been on duty an hour when death claimed him.

Epaminodas P. George was the son of Nicholas, deceased, and Mrs. Mary George, of South Fork. He was born at Benscreek, along the Somerset Pike, near Johnstown, in June about 56 years ago. He was employed by the Pennsy on the Pittsburg Division about 30 years and for 20 years had served as a freight conductor.

About 28 years ago George was married to Miss Edith Poling, of West Virginia, who survives with his aged mother, and four children: Mrs. H. J. Emerick, of Altoona, and Charles, Clifford and Helen, all at home. Several brothers and sisters at South Fork among them George Brothers, undertakers, also survive and another brother, William E. George, of Juniata, is also a Pittsburg Division freight conductor.

George was a man with scores of friends and was regarded as a pillar of the United Evangelical Church. He was a Mason and was identified with Ebensburg Lodge, No. 312, F. & A. M., Portage Royal Arch Chapter, No. 195, and Oriental Commandery, No. 61, Knights Templar, of Johnstown, and Jaffa Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Altoona, and Mountain City Lodge No. 172, Order of Railway Conductors. He was prominent in fraternal, social and church cirles in Altoona, and in Juniata, and his numerous friends will be shocked to learn of his sudden death.

His body will be brought to South Fork on the 10:51 train on Monday. On arrival at South Fork, the remains will be taken to the United Evangelical tabernacle, where services wil be held at 1:30 o'clock. Ebensburg Lodge, No. 312 F. & A. M., will conduct the lodge rituals. At the request of the family, Norman W. Hoffman of South Fork, the present Worshipful Master of Cambria Lodge, No. 376, Johnstown, will officiate as Worshipful Master during the services. Interment will be in one of the South Fork cemeteries. The pallbears will be fellow employees from Altoona who are members of the Masonic lodges at that place. The will accompany the body to South Fork.




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